Back to Earth: Systems and Sprouts

How are artists using technologies to imagine alternate realities, new alien languages and manipulate time? How can artists make the invisible visible?

Systems and Sprouts is a new episode with host Victoria Sin and guest host Victoria Ivanova, who works with the Arts Technologies team at the Serpentine on creative research and development. Together they explore the ways technology is being used as a connector to things we don’t usually perceive, from extinct species and ancient landscapes to space bacteria and the manipulation of time itself. Image credit: Jenna Sutela, I Magma App, 2019. Co-commissioned by Moderna Museet and Serpentine Galleries, 2019. Back to Earth is supported by Outset Partners’ Grant.

Jakob Kudsk Steensen discusses his work and how he uses virtual and augmented realities as a form of storytelling, allowing his audience to immerse themselves in other worlds, and the relationship between technology and emotions.

Yasaman Sheri delves into the ideas around perception and how technology can give us the ability to sense and experience beyond our human capabilities, and the beauty in exploring new forms of language and making these things visible.

Jenna Sutela’s nimiia vibie is the audio component of an audio-visual piece that uses machine learning and is inspired by experiments in interspecies communication, aspiring to connect with a world beyond our consciousness.

Systems and Sprouts focuses on artists’ relationship to technology and future thinking as part of a larger ecosystem that is building technologies of the future. You can gain more insight into the world of a new generation of artists and organisations working directly with art and advanced technologies by reading Future Art Ecosystems: Art x Advanced Technologies. https://futureartecosystems.org/

Archive

Discover 50 years of the Serpentine

From the architecture pavilion and digital commissions to the ideas marathon and the General Ecology programme, explore 50 years of artists, projects and exhibitions.

View archive